Making Technology Easier to Manage – Josh Fulton of eSquared Communication Consulting

Josh Fulton, the Founder and Managing Partner of eSquared Communication Consulting

Josh Fulton, the Founder and Managing Partner of eSquared Communication Consulting, grew his company’s revenue from $7.2 million in 2014 to $20.6 million in 2017, a 185% increase.  

eSquared Communication Consulting is a provider of high end business telecommunications services.  

In this interview with Eversprint‘s Malcolm Lui, Josh shares how he and his team accelerated their high value sales by:  

  • Capitalizing on the increasing adoption of mobility by mid-market and enterprise companies.   
  • Providing a boutique consulting approach that is quicker and more nimble than their larger competitors.  
  • Leveraging the improving speed and reliability of mobile operator networks.  

Computer generated transcript - eSquared Communication Consulting Interview | Convert audio-to-text with Sonix

Download the "Computer generated transcript - eSquared Communication Consulting Interview audio file directly. This mp3 was automatically transcribed by Sonix (https://sonix.ai).

Malcolm Lui:
Welcome to the High Value Sales Show of Eversprint.com. I'm Malcolm Lui, the Managing Member of Eversprint, and today we're speaking with Josh Fulton, the Founder and Managing Partner of eSquared Communication Consulting, a provider of high end business telecommunications services. Welcome to the show Josh.

Josh Fulton:
Thanks as well. Thank you Malcolm.

Malcolm Lui:
Josh, you grew your company's revenue from $7.2 million in 2014 to $20.6 million in 2017, a 185% increase. Before we talk about how you grew your company so fast, can you briefly share what your company does beyond my quick intro, and how your company differs from the competition?

Josh Fulton:
You bet. Thanks Malc for asking. We are a full lifecycle technology firm that focuses on mobile technology. So what that means is if you're in the transportation business or a construction business or health care business or even in retail services we handle anything inside your airspace that is mostly mobile focused. So that could be in the construction space could be devices from cell phones to Wi-Fi to tablets or laptops anything in between we're handling that device plus the applications that go on the device.

Malcolm Lui:
And how do you differ from your competitors and might be doing the same thing.

Josh Fulton:
The biggest thing we different. We differentiation with is the fact that we have a very seasoned staff our staff our people have an average tenure ship around five to six years in the industry. The average probably around industries around one to two years. So you get a very seasoned person working with alongside you. We have tons of experience so we've been doing this over almost 18 19 years now. And the experience pays off you generally in the industry are working through mobile carriers cell phone carriers from Horizon AT&T to Sprint and T-Mobile in the States. They typically have a very vast knowledge and very large product portfolio. We are very focused on a very select few vertical markets the construction health care retail space and the applications that go inside that. So we have expertise inside those verticals that set us apart from our base

Malcolm Lui:
And in terms of where you are in the wireless spectrum of things now you're just doing stuff that's related to communications among people or you're also going down to the Internet of Things and take care of those sort of communications as well

Josh Fulton:
That's a great question. We do both. So in when you start talking about retail or in extra space or health care you've got major components where you may have a tablet. That has peripheral products IO T type products through the connecting back to that tablet or device with sensors various remote types of devices that are going to handle IO T type data collecting it back so that centralized process. But yeah it's a little both nowadays enterprise IELTS is definitely a hot button space innovation automation you're seeing more and more of

Malcolm Lui:
Right now. How far do you go on the Internet of Things. Are you involved with creating assets devices that communicate with your clients systems and databases or that's more along the lines that they have this already and they need your help with connecting it.

Josh Fulton:
Were more of an integrator. So we help and consult along the way in some cases where a client will bring and send to help figure out how support ecosystem or support the lifecycle management of it are. Take the data integrated between systems so we're more of an integrator of sorts that help out with a lifecycle management of these components.

Malcolm Lui:
Right. And what do you mean by lifecycle management

Josh Fulton:
What that means is in the area of you can imagine a construction company or a transportation company. They have to buy a tablet amount data services. They have to buy peripheral barcode scanners sometimes tough books from Panasonic various other peripheral products to make the work that they're needing to do with an application work. We handled the procurement setup the deployment then then the reverse of that. So someone's saying we're done with these devices we will actually take them and recycle. But anything in between from start to finish will handle all support. We have a 24 by 7 helpdesk that's a knock that manages these devices to make sure they're operating at full capacity all types

Malcolm Lui:
Right. Okay. So pretty much everything in between right from beginning to disposal and an end in whatever needs might be needed in between those two points

Josh Fulton:
Oftentimes they they they find that they order and procure anywhere from between four to 10 different types of services to make an application work for example in the transportation space they may be buying a telematics service provider but they also need a a payroll service and maybe a training tool they may meet an inspection tool they may need some other applications that handles transactions and what happens is that in that space they end up trying to either self support or put a driver through going through multiple locations to get support. We make that simple forum they call one place it's designed for and focused in their industry. And so it makes that process from the end user much more respectable and easier to get to control. You give a high level service

Malcolm Lui:
Right. So I think within the verticals we focus on most businesses use the same applications or

Josh Fulton:
It's

Malcolm Lui:
Is

Josh Fulton:
Pretty

Malcolm Lui:
A

Josh Fulton:
Wide. I would say that it's not just always the same a lot of times now they're buying one or two off the shelf type applications trying to integrate it into a custom application. The mid-market enterprise space is typically built or are building their own mobile applications to either replicate true ERP systems inside their four walls and when they get into that space they realize there are components that they don't have in their helpdesk or other specialty I.T. departments. That's where we kind of fill in those gaps

Malcolm Lui:
Ok so. But not too much. I mean if you ask me how much is like brand new custom work where your team has it come up to speed on a new technology as opposed to being a b as opposed to integrating technologies that you're familiar with. What would that ratio be.

Josh Fulton:
Yeah it's definitely the minority. I would say it's probably like a 75 25 split so published in the time we're using conventional applications that have tried and true experiences that we're integrating and deploying but there's probably a 25 percent chance that they've built their own application or customizing the application and those scenarios where they're not standard that that's probably where. So as we reshape the most

Malcolm Lui:
And you're able to shine the most in what way. How so.

Josh Fulton:
Typically it's the challenge of trying to do something custom either in setup or deployment or custom in the hardware or even the application layer. You find that it's very difficult for either an internal high helpdesk team to do it or a specialized application support company. We we have specialized in being very customer in the area how we handle support. We are very specific in how we actually engage and how we support and train our internal people. So I think it's that customization that kind of sets us apart in that area which also adds to the fact that it's very complicated for them to do on their

Malcolm Lui:
Right. Yeah definitely I can see that a lot of moving parts as you said. Now your company grew pretty fast seven point two million in 2014 and you almost tripled it in three years to twenty point six million. What were the three biggest drivers behind that growth.

Josh Fulton:
I think it's some of the things you mentioned earlier that you have adoption of mobility as a whole that was transitioning from legacy laptops and desktop devices mobility for enterprise was been uptake for 10 15 years now it's become more more standard and with the innovation of the type of processors they're in these devices now it's replacing more and more laptops. So I think it's the combination of being in the right spot the right time applications being actually enterprise ready now that you're seeing more and more applications being pushed to the field handsets or tablets or that used to be you couldn't do it because there was too much processing power needed. And nowadays it's more available. Costs have come down so these applications that used to be very very expensive deploy now become more and more standard and then more more cases than not. Construction transportation health care and audiences are trying to stay up with this technology that's a constant changing element. So I think it's a combination of those things that kind of driven the marketplace for us.

Malcolm Lui:
So the transition to mobility do you consider that and other things you just described to me Do you consider that just one driver and there are two other drivers behind your growth or over there three things with them like you just described to me being the primary drivers.

Josh Fulton:
I think that the technology as a whole has definitely helped us. I think that we have came into an area where we filled a niche for initial customers know 18 years ago where we're filling a void that wasn't being provided by the larger enterprise space and servicing this area. So some of the competitors we compete against are IBM and Accenture. 18 team horizon and they have large entities that handle very large moving parts. But if you ask for a boutique approach for many of those folks it's very difficult or very expensive to do. And it takes a long time to implement. I think some of the implications that we've seen sometimes for years we've gentleman weeks or if not months. So I think it's the speed the nimbleness of us and the kind of overarching element of complexities that kind of come together to make us a driving business

Malcolm Lui:
So if I were to say to delineate three drivers the first one you benefit from the transition to mobility right both on a hardware and software side of things. Second one is that you're able to provide a boutique experience unlike the larger firms which certainly can do it but they would take longer to do and they would I would imagine casa. Orders of magnitude more than for you to do it. I got that right for drivers wanting to

Josh Fulton:
Yes that's correct

Malcolm Lui:
Is our third driver that that sticks in your mind minus

Josh Fulton:
I would say that the mobile operating networks became faster over the last five six years where it's enabled connectivity to be more on the line of a hard line connection. So when you move from 4G LTE to now what's about to come out and 5G technology. I think you're getting the similar experience on a mobile architecture that allows for flexibility. I think that's also driven a lot of the changes as well.

Malcolm Lui:
Right now you didn't say this explicitly but I imagine it's related in regards to the cloud. How is that helping your business. Like are the software apps now just on the file then you're just using the hard line like nature of the mobile networks to access the applications. Is that how it works or applications on the device themselves

Josh Fulton:
Most of the time in mid-market enterprise we see kind of a hybrid approach. I don't see all or nothing. It's half the architecture is in a cloud environment half of its on an on premise or a cloud infrastructure buildout for or a enterprise organization. We use almost a mix ourselves. Most of our devices that are managed by what's called an MDMA tool all are in a cloud architecture. All of our data center is a kind of a mixed use of both cloud and premise based applications. So I think cloud has been an element. I think consumers have been the driver for most of the cloud early adoption businesses have kind of lagged behind on the cloud architecture. I think for the most part you still see a mix of both cloud premise base and kind of a hybrid approach. So I don't know if it's entirely the driver that made the difference for us but I think it's definitely made it easier to scale applications on the marketplace

Malcolm Lui:
Right. So why haven't enterprises jumped in the cloud architecture. It seems like conceptually it seems good makes life easier for them. If you need to update the 10000 devices that are out there he could do it at one go in the cloud as opposed to updating each device individually

Josh Fulton:
Sometimes they can actually achieve the same thing with higher level security. There's always a security issue between some of the concerns that it whether they actually control their data or not. I think it's a combination of of legacy systems and the cost to convert. Is probably the biggest drivers that takes probably a lengthier time to see cloud emerging in that area where you have a standalone application give it like a PBX phone system that you can move into the cloud fairly easily or if you have an MDA controller device that's in the cloud. I think those are easy to move if they're standalone if they are integrated. I think there's some complexities and some data controls that you you worry about

Malcolm Lui:
Right. So you've got a wider array of projects over the past 18 years or so even around what's been the most interesting project that you've worked on that you can share details about.

Josh Fulton:
Well one of the the most interesting ones has been when we built scratch applications some of those have come and gone. Some didn't have a long lifespan but just seeing the early adoption building out an application for either a transportation construction or health care it kept up a client. It's exciting you know filling a void in that marketplaces is a fun experience. I think the most as far as a business that we definitely tout that we've used and probably have had the best experience with integrating Sysco Foods was are our client that we've probably had the most experience within the transportation space that gave us a broad spectrum of different different aspects of services that I probably would say I'm the most proud of

Malcolm Lui:
Can you give some details as to what you did for them.

Josh Fulton:
Sysco foods is one of the largest food delivery companies in the United States. They operate over ten thousand trucks public information. They had converted their infrastructure over some legacy telematics systems over a period of time about a year and a half. We were the lead integrator and taking their old system and pushing into the new system. It gave us great great pride in being able to do that and able to do it on time on budget. So it's it's exciting products to tout for sure.

Malcolm Lui:
Very cool. And were you helping them define the project at the very beginning or did they already have the project defined and they brought you in to get it done

Josh Fulton:
We were definitely in the with the early phases of planning. There was a consulting group that helped bring us in to help implement some of the projects that we were definitely at the table. I wouldn't say I'd take credit for actually helping implementation of that perspective for him. But we definitely were part of the early stages of planning for sure

Malcolm Lui:
Right. And I imagine that sort of project has huge impact to Cisco right. In terms of having more data available more quickly where we're all the 10000 trucks maybe

Josh Fulton:
It's made a massive improvement from a customer experience to trying to keep them inside a compliance area for electronic log devices only down to handling their barcode scanners when they actually offload products to trucks. So it's it's a pretty broad transportation application forum and it's made a huge impact in their operations and it made a huge impact for the customer.

Malcolm Lui:
Right. Yeah I can imagine that. And that seems like a pretty complex project right. If you go all the way from the end customers even just managing and tracking where the assets may be at a corporate level

Josh Fulton:
For sure

Malcolm Lui:
How many years is that project

Josh Fulton:
It is a we are still under contract with them. We it was a five year project. We have about two two and a half years left of that project.

Malcolm Lui:
So naive. You've already finished implementing and now you're more of a maintenance monitoring optimizing place

Josh Fulton:
Yeah I'd say we're. We're definitely past the point of implementation we are now in the fully what we call the lifecycle management of it which really is now going back through and continuing to keep maintain the devices maintain the hardware and the applications and improve it as we can along the way. So now we're in the phase of maintaining it

Malcolm Lui:
All right. Now is Cisco your typical client in terms of size and are you making work with medium and large enterprises.

Josh Fulton:
But we as a whole focus on the mid market to enterprise space that's where most of our clients are. We have a variety in that space but we do have very small customers some of what we consider S&P customers are. We definitely have a very large base of mid-market enterprise customers because the fact that I think our value statement ends up definitely leverage with scale. If you are going into an application to deploy it with larger and larger scale it definitely has more value in that space

Malcolm Lui:
Right. So how do you go about winning a contract the likes of Cisco. What's what's your sales and marketing process.

Josh Fulton:
And in that process oriented those kind of larger engagements. It is that we have a direct sales team and we engage directly to those type of customers On a regular basis. We also go to market with our partners of software companies. We are integrate oftentimes that software partners so if you think your retail partners in the PLM systems we are integrated inside a retail PLM software deployment our pitch. And so we are integrated into that process. So we are there mobile lifecycle management. Architecture. Kind of engineer expert in the background. So we're going to market with a combination effort

Malcolm Lui:
Ok. What percentage of your revenue comes from your direct sales as opposed to or rather what percentage of your new business comes from your direct sales team versus yourself software partners who bring you in

Josh Fulton:
As a whole it's probably a split pretty close that even we we have a growing list of partners in the software space that is probably growing faster than our direct sales team but as right as of right now it's even

Malcolm Lui:
Right now IDF hardware partners as well.

Josh Fulton:
We do. So some of our hardware partners are brand names you recognize like Samsung and a lot of the carriers are partners as well so things like an 18 team horizon are our partners of arms. We have software partners in the space that manage devices like from VM from Air Watch to Saudi our forty two gears for sure to end VM so we have a variety of software partner and brand names we definitely recognize

Malcolm Lui:
Right. I imagine there probably some service partners as well. Can where they bring you in because he has a do in 20 different areas of work that their client needs some lifecycle management at their technology. Right. They'll bring you in as well

Josh Fulton:
For sure. Yeah we find that there are companies out there that have either trying to find support either as an enterprise themselves or trying to get rid of handling the day to day operations of an application or through managing a device. They're trying to get out of that game and they look for us from that perspective as a direct type of engagement indirect engagement is typically making a deployment of an application easier and more simplified. So that's where we kind of see both those elements of working well

Malcolm Lui:
Right. Looking ahead a bit for 2019. What can you share with us in regards to what growth targets you might have from a revenue perspective. What challenges your team needs to overcome to hit those targets. Anything they want. Any strengths going to leverage and so on.

Josh Fulton:
As a whole we've we've grown between 15 to upwards of 20 percent year over year growth consistently for almost 18 years. This year feels just like the rest. They feel like it's going to be on on that same kind of level. So like we're it's it's gonna be a great year in the area. Some of these emerging new software company partnerships we have a couple of startups that are in the process of starting up right now. In a variety of a new kind of entertainment vertical markets. We're very excited about a product that we see. It's called surf it is a tablet in the back of a mover and tepid car where they're providing specialized content onto that device which we're very excited about to see they kind of explode. So so the startups I think are very excited about that. I think the marketplace as a whole is still very stable. I feel like that the enterprise mid-market spaces the verticals we focus on are still in an investment mode and trying to find growth at the same time trying to lean out their operations and make a better experience in customer so which aligns very well for our business.

Malcolm Lui:
Right. How do your how does a direct sales team go about finding new business for you.

Josh Fulton:
I would say they use a variety of tools is networking it's still some of the old fashioned ways that really matter the most. Our ability to connect with people face to face is still very very important to our business. They use a variety ways to do that. They use trade shows they use meetings they use networking events they used the you to get contacts or LinkedIn. I'd say it's a variety of ways. I'd like to say that some of the newer ways through social media has enhanced it. It definitely has not replaced good old fashioned face to face meetings though

Malcolm Lui:
Right now how do they go about getting those face to face meetings are they cold calling smiling and dialing say you're doing an inbound marketing type campaign and getting people to express interest and then they follow up on what's the you know how did they get that meeting for you

Josh Fulton:
Know it's not as easy as you used to be. You'll find that they are using a variety of newer ways to do that. So a combination of drip campaigns through email marketing to try to find ways of connecting through trade shows and getting an introduction through a variety of partners to finding ways of getting referrals into other relationships. It's not as easy. I think smiling and dialing is not something that is scalable like it was 10 years ago. It has to be somebody you've evolved to a newer technology to make it work where it's actually more effective.

Malcolm Lui:
I took a look at your online presence from a paperclip perspective and it FCO perspective and not seeing much presence at all. Almost a quitting my job is almost zero presence in both dimensions. What's your take on that. From a business perspective.

Josh Fulton:
We've not really found that to be something that drives our business. We've we've definitely would we're such a niche element. We can't really find a good SEO approach that is pulled in the right audience without overspending to gain that audience. So as a whole that's been one of the challenges when you get into a niche market identifying those as much more complicated in my opinion. So I think that we see that the online our social media feeds are even spending money in the social media platforms really not paid off as far as our perspective. That's why

Malcolm Lui:
Right

Josh Fulton:
I say that it really pays to be in the networking space to build that kind of layered on with some of these things even like doing this right here this podcast or audio or layering on the social element of kind of creating a brand awareness that we think that actually works. But we don't see because we are a B2B play. We don't see a lot of the old traditional ways working. So we're trying to reinvent I think a lot of the market is to

Malcolm Lui:
Right. Have you tried paper campaigns at all

Josh Fulton:
We have. I mean of course over 18 years you tried everything. But that is as of recently we have not tried anything pay per click. We have tried various social media try to find for example and so I linked in. We know the right contacts that generally are buying from us but trying to find the right combination of advertising so that space to build up drive traffic has been difficult

Malcolm Lui:
Yeah. Yeah. It takes a lot of experimentation right and marketing is essentially a huge adversary experiment and it was the old adage you know 50 percent of the marketing work. The problem is you don't know which side is the side that works until you do it.

Josh Fulton:
Yeah. That's right. We find it's difficult because you know if you read a couple of folks that I think that are actually quite interesting online there's a company called scaled which is a newer business. Did you can find on LinkedIn when the founder and CEO does a lot of video post does a lot of blogging which creates an online kind of brand awareness. I think that that type of PR layering I think that can work for B2B marketing perspective. I don't I don't think that there's really one formula that kind of gets the audience is there's so much of online research going on before you get inside that selling cycle that you need to be ahead of that curve because by the time we get a hold of them they they've done a ton of research so very knowledgeable so we need to be early and that say is the best way we think we can do it is through social media kind of layering through PR campaigns that really make a difference out there.

Malcolm Lui:
Yeah but like you said the challenge is finding the right audience because imagine a social media you have and because of the space you're in you will attract a lot of people to check out check out what you're doing who really aren't your ideal customer. Your ideal client

Josh Fulton:
And most social media was designed for consumers in mind. Twitter Facebook specifically. I think those are made for consumers. I think that the more niche LinkedIn has more of a business audience for sure. I think that you can if you can layer that into traditional media PR campaigns where you do the business journal The Wall Street Journal art through various vertical kind of media outlets I think I think that makes a difference. I think that starts adding vertical expertise. I think if you tried to do broad it is a large sense of a waste of time waste money.

Malcolm Lui:
Yeah. So what exciting trends do you see. You mentioned kind of a little bit about tablets in the back of Goobers. You know technology is constantly making hardware and software less expensive from a mobile wireless perspective. What trends are you seeing and floating ahead of you that you can take advantage of

Josh Fulton:
We're seeing the the kind of beginning of the end of a laptop is what I think we're seeing you're seeing more and more people in the business world converting away from a laptop to a tablet style device. I think that is going to continue to tap and I think eventually the tablet market owns the overarching laptop market and you'll find more and more of the handheld devices now can compute at a speed that a desktop can say you're going to see some of that hybrid elements where for example Samsung has several different brought products we actually can dock your handheld device and replace your desktop experience with a broad big screen on would be basically using your tablet or your laptop or cell phone as a replacement. So I think you're going to see that continue. Enterprises are trying to use IO T to add automation to the processes. If it's. A cold chain delivery transportation system trying to monitor temperature through their trailers or if it's an asset tracking environment where they're trying to make sure they can locate different devices that expense that type of IO T in enterprise is making that more more affordable health care is doing very similar things. So I think you're seeing emergence of remote patient monitoring that is emerging market space as part of the next few years are going to see more and more of it where you see a tablet and peripheral products that really attach to themselves to make it easier to monitor patients to lower costs of health care. So I think those are some emerging markets we see between Io team mobility. I think you're going to see a large percentage of what we think that's going to be emerging. You're replacing traditional systems

Malcolm Lui:
Any particular trends that might be adverse for your business that you're keeping an eye out on an eye on

Josh Fulton:
Yeah. You know trade wars are not good for technology as a whole. You know we're always kind of slightly concerned about that. So much of the product is made in manufacturing overseas. So that is a concern. Economics make a difference. Right. If we have a strong economics we people invest in technology it can be flipped though when you do have a downside economy. People do invest to optimize the business mature. So I think as a whole you know the concerns around labor shortages trade wars the areas of some of the advent of automation are some concerns when I see automation. We like to say we use technology to compliment a human experience. We don't want an automation to drive out the human condition. So we are trying to make sure we're always making that relevant in those spaces. A lot of people that are trying to use technology to replace people we think of it as a compliment to it. So I think some of those are some of the challenges and the over marketplace today that I think are definitely a race trying to deal with figure it out go forward.

Malcolm Lui:
All right. In regards to the challenges for your company to continue to grow 15 to 20 percent every year is there one particular challenge that your team needs to consistently overcome.

Josh Fulton:
It's traditional things. You know we're we're a small business. We've got a hundred and forty five employees we're not AT&T we're not a center or an IBM so it's it's the size of the business competing with very large businesses out there with very deep pockets. So for us the ability to continue to find ways of growth we've got to innovate faster we've got to be better than the large betters in the marketplace. So traditionally we've done that for 18 years. I don't see a reason why we won't be able to continue to do that. I think that we as a whole think that the market is trying to innovate around technology to give a good sweet spot between the two is what a lot of what one of our customers are wanting nowadays. So I think that's what

Malcolm Lui:
Right. When you say innovating around top technology in the sweet spot. Elaborate on that a little bit

Josh Fulton:
Yeah I think that there's a if you look at the four verticals I mentioned from a retail experience our restaurants are if you think of a health care provider in a home or construction and our transportation any of those folks that call in to get our support are very interested in providing a white glove high touch experience. So we're not automating that experience out. So it's not something that you go through if you call into a large corporation like American Express or AT&T where you go through 15 different levels of automation before you get hold the person they want to know that you're gonna get hold of a person in our environment. So that's in its domestic support is what's more one of the things you're seeing more more for security reasons other than that. So I think that the sweet spot when I say that is is trying not to automate that that human interaction so that they can get to the right person and we can fix the problem fast versus trying to completely automate it with a self-help approach which is what a lot of people are doing. If you look at what Google does from a NASA perspective they're trying to figure out how to support their nest products by using a bunch of self-help tools at the same time. At the end of the road eventually will allow you to get to our person but they really force you through a self-help approach. What our customers want is definitely giving that that driver that's in there in a truck that's trying to figure out a problem with their technology the ability to get hold of an actual live human being is still a very important tool.

Malcolm Lui:
Yeah to solving the problem quickly pays dividends as opposed to I think five minutes going through some menu and getting stuck in a path and not being able to go backwards. That's incredibly frustrating.

Josh Fulton:
It's incredibly frustrating and in the end you you're not always giving the right level support to solve it. So some of the problems that we deal with because they are more customized you can't really put an automation in place right now that makes it too easy. You can have a guy that helps out with getting the person the problem to the right kind of source to make it faster. You can use automation to identify problems before they happen which is what we do. So as a whole you can use those type of technologies to make it easier and faster but really at the end of the day you got to solve that problem and you got to give still a human touch to it.

Malcolm Lui:
Yeah wholly agree and anything that would give you the edge as well. Right now that people are going the automation route and then you provide this high touch high gloves a high glove service your your your customers or clients and they're going to have an edge over their competitors whether it be for in-house or or external use

Josh Fulton:
Yeah I think it's the combination. If you compliment it. Right. So when I call comes into our support center today we know a lot about that person calling and we know they've called him before we know what kind of problems we've had in the past. We know they're calling in a certain period time. Is it related to the previous problem. We know what type of device that they have what application they have. And we had the ability to remote into the device instantly. So that type of complimenting of a I remote tool mobile application all of those things come together to make that experience where in the end the person on the other end of the phone is able to get back to doing their job faster. That's our goal

Malcolm Lui:
Right. And everyone's happy when they can do that for sure.

Josh Fulton:
For sure.

Malcolm Lui:
Three last questions for you. Say you would have a billboard. Maybe you want to have your billboard set up in front of one of your biggest enterprise businesses that you want to do business with. What would be the message that you have on that billboard for them to see

Josh Fulton:
That's a good question. The the probably the type of client we want typically is is an area of those vertical markets I've mentioned several times. They we I would say that it would something along the lines we make your technology simple to manage something along the lines that makes it easy for them to understand that if you if you'll allow us the opportunity to manage your technology we'll do it easier and faster and cheaper than you're doing it today. So in some kind of messaging orientation that's what I would try to say. But

Malcolm Lui:
Right. Easier or faster tech management easier faster cheaper. ENGINE REVVING You're saying that it almost reminded me of the Six Million Dollar Man. If you remember that show.

Josh Fulton:
Absolutely I was a good show

Malcolm Lui:
Yeah it was awesome chef Steve Austin. He is the man faster stronger better at

Josh Fulton:
Right.

Malcolm Lui:
The end. Two last questions. I know you've mentioned it throughout our hour call and maybe you can summarize it again. Who are your ideal clients and what's the best way for them to reach your team.

Josh Fulton:
Deal clients are in the mid-market size to enterprise size in the vertical markets of construction health care retail that is in transportation space. Those type of clients that have two to maybe 10 different types of technology that they're outfitting for their individual employee which have some complexity around mobile applications desktop integration and a lot of moving parts to pull it all together. That's that's kind of our ideal client. If you're in the retail space and you're trying to now reinvent your retail experience you're putting tablets in that environment or if you're in a restaurant and you're you're now removing either waiters and waitresses and you're putting tablets on the desktop to place orders and you're trying to figure out the technology of that we are looking for those type of clients where they have mobile and they're trying complexities of trying to manage that ecosystem to make it simple find so they can actually go back to doing what their core business says

Malcolm Lui:
All right. And when you say midmarket How do you define that by revenue by number employees number of locations

Josh Fulton:
It's typically employees and revenue the combination. So I would say typically two thousand employees and above is kind of our mid-market line. For us it is definitely wildly different from place to place where you define it but we look at two thousand employees and above this typically what we're shooting for over a billion dollars in revenue is typically are our Client

Malcolm Lui:
All right. So for these these companies of this size is take a long time from initial contact to building a relationship and actually winning a deal with them.

Josh Fulton:
Sales cycle and definitely long the average right around a year is a whole. So definitely sales cycles are long and definitely takes a while to identify him and find them and recruit them as customer

Malcolm Lui:
Right. All right. Josh it's been awesome having you on my show today. I really enjoyed hearing how you grew your company so fast

Josh Fulton:
Malcolm, thank you for having me.

Malcolm Lui:
We've been speaking with Josh Fulton, the Founder and Managing Partner of eSquared Communication Consulting, about his company's rapid growth. For interviews with other fast growing, high value sales companies, or to learn how we can accelerate your firm's high value sales through automation, visit Eversprint.com.

Convert audio to text with Sonix. Sonix is the best online audio transcription software

Sonix accurately transcribed the audio file, “Computer generated transcript - eSquared Communication Consulting Interview” , using cutting-edge AI. Get a near-perfect transcript in minutes, not hours or days when you use Sonix. Sonix is the industry-leading audio-to-text converter. Signing up for a free trial is easy.

Convert mp3 to text with Sonix

For audio files (such as “Computer generated transcript - eSquared Communication Consulting Interview”), thousands of researchers and podcasters use Sonix to automatically transcribe mp3 their audio files. Easily convert your mp3 file to text or docx to make your media content more accessible to listeners.

Best audio transcription software: Sonix

Researching what is “the best audio transcription software” can be a little overwhelming. There are a lot of different solutions. If you are looking for a great way to convert mp3 to text , we think that you should try Sonix. They use the latest AI technology to transcribe your audio and are one my favorite pieces of online software.

Listen on Google Play Music
Listen to Stitcher
Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin